Luca

luqa57125041

Techie, Indie Maker, Co-Founder https://t.co/gDkMZcnQZH 🕙, https://t.co/GmwCcHrp2E 🚀

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I don't want to be rude, but why are you selling this? If it works right now, it will stop working when too many people use and if it works right now you could probably make a lot more money without selling it.
@luqa57125041 very fair question and one we thought long about to.

You are completely correct, no working trading system is infinitely scaleable and we are no exception.

However, we aren't dealing with penny stocks. We limit our stock picks to large cap companies. This means it takes A LOT of capital for any (or multiple) individuals to move the stock price so much that it has any affect on others profits for buying the same stock afterwards.

That's the most important piece to be able to share these publicly.

However there are 2 other things we do to ensure this won't be an issue.

#1 our pricing model. The way our pricing works is that it gets more expensive every time anyone signs up. Making less and less people willing to pay.

#2 Right now there's a cap of max 100 users. (Currently 66 open seats left). Once we hit this limit no one else can sign up until some one else cancels their subscription.

Weeklystocktip.com isn't designed to be a platform with millions of users. That doesn't work in trading signals just like you say.

You may ask why we bother doing this at all if we're only going to allow 100 people in the system. We're building a public record so it will be easier to start a credible hedgefund in the future. While we're building this record we thought why not give away these tips for a little penny and build trust with our customers ahead of time.

And of course we use it ourselves as well.

That's exactly where we're at now. I hope that helps answer your question :)

Cheers,
Mark Lyck
wow, really cool Kumar. I will try it!
Overall, I like your site. I would change the copy in the header (Borrowist-it's free, works best on laptops) because it says nothing about your product. I don't think that making the main CTA button invisible on hover is a good idea.
@luqa57125041 Thanks Luca, will note these suggestions and make modifications!
There is a typo. "Bussiness coaching" instead of business coaching. I would use "full name" instead of complete name in the final form. Good luck :D
Using stock photos for fake testimonials is one of the dumbest things I've ever seen.
@luqa57125041 Hey Luca, thanks for taking the time to look through the site and read through the content. Yes, two are using stock photos since we didn't have the images of the people in time!

Best of luck with Orca and Rundmsquid!

I looked at your pricing page. I don't get what the different options offer. Another question: can I use it to add an audio version of my blog posts? So that my readers can choose between audio and video version.
@luqa57125041 Hi Luca! The only difference between Standard and Premium is the number of credits included in each plan (3,000 vs. 12,000). Using the standard voices, you can convert 100 characters for 1 credit. Using the HQ (premium voices), you can convert 100 characters for 4 credits. Sure, you can create a feed for your blog, but each account has only 1 podcast feed so I wouldn't mix it with your private reading list in that case. Hope this clear things up!
@Miickel thanks for your answer. From desktop the difference between the two packages was clear, from mobile, at least for me, it wasn't.

How would the feed creation process look like? Can I embed an audio player on my website? Or my readers need to subscribe to your service?

Thanka for your time
@luqa57125041 Ah, gotcha! I will try to make that difference more visible on mobile, thanks for pointing that out.

Since TAYL is aimed primarily on B2C (e.g. our customers use the service to turn what they usually read into a podcast feed they themselves can listen to), we don't have any embeddable audio player or such. This is a feature that a sister product I'm currently develop will solve (will launch in a couple of weeks).

You can however still use TAYL for this use-case, by for example creating a Zapier integration that checks your blog's RSS and sends new posts to TAYL for reading. Then you simply share your podcast URL with the readers of your blog.
@Miickel I would try playing around... maybe you could add the option to download the audio file.
@Miickel thanks for your answer. From desktop the difference between the two packages was clear, from mobile, at least for me, it wasn't.

How would the feed creation process look like? Can I embed an audio player on my website? Or my readers need to subscribe to your service?

Thanka for your time
@luqa57125041 Ah, gotcha! I will try to make that difference more visible on mobile, thanks for pointing that out.

Since TAYL is aimed primarily on B2C (e.g. our customers use the service to turn what they usually read into a podcast feed they themselves can listen to), we don't have any embeddable audio player or such. This is a feature that a sister product I'm currently develop will solve (will launch in a couple of weeks).

You can however still use TAYL for this use-case, by for example creating a Zapier integration that checks your blog's RSS and sends new posts to TAYL for reading. Then you simply share your podcast URL with the readers of your blog.
@Miickel I would try playing around... maybe you could add the option to download the audio file.
@Miickel I would try playing around... maybe you could add the option to download the audio file.
@freedayin Read aloud text-to-speech quality is embarassing. While not perfeft, tayl is a lot better.
The app is really cool! The pricing is not clear and the copy needs some work.
@luqa57125041 Thank you for your feedback! yes, we will need more work. Right now, we want it simple as possible!
@mbbillz "ridicolous", "naive", "delusional", "I meant no offence or disrespect".

You should at least own that you wanted to be disrespectful and you actually did a good job at it. Those fake execuses ("I apologise if it came across that way") are a good way of saying that you have no fault if someone perceived your voluntarily offensive words as their are.

By the way, Kylie Jenner's website is built on Shopify (no code tool), there are literally hundreds of 8 and 9 figures companies built on wordpress (another no code tool). One app built on bubble raised $300 million, another one has 100k MAUs. Webflow raised $70 million and is valuated at $350 million.

The time for no-code tools is coming. There will be left technical jobs only for really good engineers so I understand your fear.
@luqa57125041 Is saying that someone's claim is ridiculous really offensive? If so then sure, I will happily own that. I take back my 'fake apology'.

Regardless, I am aware that there are hundreds of huge sites built using 'no-code' tools, it doesn't necessarily mean they're always fit for purpose. My beef is with the *claim* that they're a like-for-like substitute for hiring engineers. It's disingenuous. Agreed, the tools are useful and can serve a purpose up to a point but saying you can build the next AirBnb using a 'no-code' tool is like saying you can do your own heart bypass by watching a YouTube tutorial.

If you have a closer look at 'no-code' built sites, you'd understand my point. Poor performance and accessibility, divitis/non-semantic HTML or no evidence of best practice, lack of adherence to W3 standards, responsive layout issues, outdated libraries, bugs, poor browser compatibility etc. The companies who build the tools only get away with it because the average person doesn't realise this is what they're paying for as they're likely to never see or understand the underlying code. Eventually the customer can't understand why it "doesn't work", goes to an expert and shits themselves when they find out the REAL cost of building something properly and realises they splashed all their budget on something else.

I don't think it's too much to ask for there to be more transparency about what it is these tools actually provide and how they compare to the 'real-thing' so that people aren't misled to begin with.

Regarding your last point, what do I have to be fearful of? I highly doubt that in my lifetime programming will become obsolete so quickly that there isn't time to adapt. Even if it did, the 'old' stuff won't just cease to exist - even today there's a niche demand for devs to work on ancient legacy code from 15 years ago. The rest of us will just become architects or 'machine commanders' or whatever new occupation... that's all provided humans haven't all destroyed ourselves and the planet by then 😂.
@mbbillz saying you can build AirBnb is the best way of building the association and be specific with examples.
First AirBnb or similars are not simply successful because they are technically complex or have big number of engineers are working on them. Second AirBnb and all similars started very simple and grew over time. This is AirBnb in 2012 while being 3-4 years old startup http://web.archive.org/web/20120104122432/http://www.airbnb.com/ now you tell me if it's jquery or whatever and if it makes a difference at all!

If no-code tool can enable to get started and run first few years it's already huge win and we will also see scaling use cases on top.
@mkrtchyanartur I personally think the average, non-techy person would take it literally, but anyway at least you're the first person to describe it as what it is - a temporary solution for testing/prototyping fledgling ideas. Again, I have no issue with that, but IMO that's not what it's being marketed as.

Perhaps my stance is 'unpopular opinion', I've said my bit - it'd be fruitless to try and persuade people ad infinitum, if they're unconvinced then that's fair enough.